This month, the final versions of two of my articles have been published by Oxford University Press. OUP’s approach to copyright allows pre-prints to be posted on sites like SSRN, but for final versions, the author is supplied with a free-access URL instead. This link can be posted on personal or institutional sites (like this one).

(1) Daithí Mac Síthigh, ‘App law within: rights and regulation in the smartphone age‘ (2013) 21 International Journal of Law and Information Technology 154-186.

An earlier version appeared as a working paper, posted here. The final version includes the changes proposed by the editor and by peer reviewers (including some reorganisation and clarification of the core questions), as well as a small number of subsequent developments.

(2) Daithí Mac Síthigh, ‘The fragmentation of intermediary liability in the UK‘ (2013) 8 Journal of Intellectual Property Law & Practice 521-531.

This is now online for the first time. It’s a shorter paper (just at the upper limit of 7500 words for this journal, although they print in columns so it’s not too long when printed!), which started life as a talk and a briefing paper for events with legal practitioners. Subsequently, I wrote it up in more detail, and also added new material on the Defamation Bill (now Act) as it developed. Here’s the abstract:

It is argued that the system for intermediary liability (for mere conduits, hosts and search engines) is splitting into a number of different systems.

In the case of copyright, intermediaries (particular mere conduits) have new duties. However, regarding defamation (and to a lesser extent privacy), new schemes are reducing the liability risk of hosts – under certain circumstances.

The result is that the single system of the Electronic Commerce Directive is being replaced by a mixture of EU and national legislation, revived common law doctrines, and specific provisions for particular areas of law.