The annual Norfolk Law Lecture takes place here at UEA on Thursday 26th November at 6.30pm, in the shiny new Thomas Paine Study Centre (so new that I don’t even have a picture of it yet, but it’s very nice). The speaker is the honourable Mr. Justice David Eady of the High Court of England & Wales, and his topic is the above question. He’s known to many of you for his decisions in the areas of libel law and the development of the law of privacy in the UK.

It’s fair to say that Eady is a somewhat controversial judge, not particularly liked by some newspaper editors, though defended by lawyers and others, and has been involved in various high-profile cases, such as that of Max Mosley (refusing an injunction that would have prevented the publication of a video in [2008] EWHC 687 (QB) and awarding £60,000 in damages for a privacy claim in [2008] EWHC 1777 (QB)), the very important Internet law case of Bunt v Tilley [2006] EWHC 407 (QB), and Ash v McKennitt [2005] EWHC 3003 (QB) on breach of confidence and privacy. As a judge, he has also presided over trials such as Jameel (which reached the House of Lords, on questions of qualified privilege and of corporate reputation as [2006] UKHL 44), and his involvement in privacy law is a long-standing one, including membership of the Calcutt Committee of nearly 20 years ago (!) that recommended changes to the UK law of privacy.

All are welcome, and there will be a report on this blog, as well as in other fine publications, no doubt…